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The Fuhrer’s Orphans – David Laws

by Stephen Wynn on October 29, 2020

I can recommend the following book for you to read, in the shape of the latest offering from David Laws, The Fuhrer’s Orphans.

The story is of a group of 27 children homeless children who find themselves living on the streets of Munich during the course of the Second World War, after their parents are sent to concentration camps.

They are taken in by a local teacher but a problem arises when she also takes in two homeless refugees, putting her own safety at risk by doing so.

At the same time a British spy working undercover and behind enemy lines in Munich, is on an important mission that if successful could ultimately determine who wins the war. He discovers the children’s  hiding place which then presents him with the dilemma, does he continue with the mission or try to save the children.

The decision he makes will change history. What does he decide to do?

Read the book for yourself and find out.

The Fuhrer’s Orphans is a well written, powerful and fast moving book which is based on true events. It is one of those books that once you start reading, you will not want to put down.


Munich – The Man Who Said No

by Stephen Wynn on June 28, 2020

Munich - The man who said noA really interesting book, and well worth a read. Munich – The Man Said No, tells the story of how two men gatecrash the conference at Munich as the then British Prime Minister, Neville Chamberlain, is about to sign an agreement, which in essence gives Adolf Hitler everything that he wants in relation to Czechoslovakia.

One of the men is an American correspondent who cannot believe Chamberlain’s naïvety at giving in to Nazis demands. He is determined to stop the deal from going ahead, by bursting in to the conference, and as he makes his declaration to the gathering of world leaders, including Chamberlain and Hitler, his friend pulls a gun ………. I will stop there, and leave you to find out what happens yourself.

Trust me, if thrillers are your thing, then this is a book you will not be able to put down.

Find our more about the author David Laws on his website and Facebook page.


Disaster Before D-Day

by Stephen Wynn on August 9, 2019

Writing any book is enjoyable, but knowing that something I have written has had a positive impact on someone’s life, makes it even better. I received the following e-mail from Allan J Cameron Jr in the United States.

Stephen,

I read your book Disaster Before D-Day today and I could not put it down. My father is on the cover of the book. He is the soldier holding the cable on the Higgins boat landing ramp. My dad (deceased) Pfc Allan J Cameron was a Combat Engineer that volunteered to go with the invasion force to Omaha (his unit never left England).

My brother found a copy of this photo on the internet. It was described as the landing at Omaha Beach. I did some research and one of the researchers at the D Day Museum in New Orleans, LA said that it was most likely not Omaha but rather Slapton Sands in England.

Like many men of the “Greatest Generation” my father Allan J Cameron (31299492) did not give us much in the way of details of his service. It was not something they talked about, it was just something they did.

Allan enlisted in the US Army at the age of 18 (24 Feb 1943) in Boston, Ma near where he grew up in Summerville, Ma. He was assigned to the 444 Engineers and after training in the States he was shipped to England (17 Jul 1943).

Pfc Cameron was the oldest son of Scottish immigrants and before he left for England his father told him that if he wanted to survive the war and life in the military “volunteer for everything”. When the call went out for Engineers for the invasion my dad “volunteered”.

After my father’s death in 1990 my mother was invited to a reunion of the 444th Engineers and she learned that he was the only soldier from his unit that left England. In a subsequent search for Al’s military records we found that they were lost in a fire in Overland, Missouri in 1972.

After his discharge in 1946, Al returned to civilian life where he met his wife Irene and started a family. Being an avid Boston Red Sox (Baseball) fan, Al heard that Red Sox star Johnny Pesky was going to appear in the area and decided to go. He was told that he had to sign up for the Army Reserves in order to get in to see Pesky, (“don’t worry, you don’t do much in the Reserves and the money is good”). A few months later he was in Korea because he was a trained combat veteran.

It took me way too long to realize that these men were the “Greatest Generation” because we were too busy being the rebellious youth of the 60’s and 70’s (we were so stupid back then).

I recently came across you book and bought it to add to my collection.

Allan J Cameron Jr.


THE WARRIORS REPOSE – A HISTORY OF THE ROYAL CHELSEA HOSPITAL – 1682-2017

by Stephen Wynn on July 13, 2018

This book is due to be published in December 2018 in hardback. I have just been informed by the publisher that it will also be coming out in paperback in September 2019.


Mix up over Hyphens

by Stephen Wynn on

An article appeared in the Daily Mail newspaper this week, written by the papers science correspondent, Victoria Allen. It concerned Christina Sanchez-Stockhammer, who is a linguistics professor at Ludwig Maximillan University of Munich.

After studying 10,000 words, including hyphens, Christina has found that four basic rules will work 75% of the time. Now thats all clear in your head, here is a flavour of what she said. “If a word is a verb, adjective, or adverb, it probably needs a hyphen. Chain-smoke and broken-down are good examples.” Got that? “If the noun has three or more syllables, it is two separate words. Examples here include bathing suit and washing machine.” Hopefully that has cleared up any and all ambiguities and everything is now absolutely crystal clear.

There was more to the article, which once I have worked out what all of the above actually means, I will add in at a later date.